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Beethoven Tour 2021 - 2022

The tickets for Beethoven concerts are already available.

There is no doubt that the latest Beethoven tour is the biggest music even of the year. The Beethoven tickets are being sold out at a lightning speed but there’s still a chance to book the spots for an amazing price! Every concert sees a huge number of fans gather around the stage in anticipation of a wonderful experience. Only the best arenas, stadiums, and concert halls are able to host these events and provide all the necessary services to thousands of people. Our service is also offering Beethoven VIP packages for dedicated fans.

Every true fan of quality music has the chance to savor the most amazing music performance of the year. Here you can purchase the tickets for all your favorite shows. Take the front row seat and enjoy the perfection of sound.

We care about your preferences and here you will find the best tickets matching your needs. In addition, you can choose tickets based on your seat preference. With our website it is easy to follow the Beethoven schedule and see all the upcoming shows along with important details. Just check the concert schedule and decide what the best spot to see and hear everything is!

You can’t really find anything similar to a live performance anywhere else. Even the best headphones or the largest TV screen doesn’t compare to the feeling of excitement and emotion at a concert while being surrounded by thousands of people who share the same passion. Thousands of people are coming together like one big family just to share their experience and love for the performer. You can check the details of every concert right here and decide whether that’s exactly what you’ve been looking for.

You can check the ticket availability for your hometown concert right now! Here you will find the Beethoven tickets 2021 and all the details related to their live performances.


Beethoven Tickets 2021 - 2022



Beethoven VIP Packages 2021 - 2022



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    About Beethoven

    Ludwig van Beethoven (; German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːtˌhoːfn̩] (About this soundlisten); baptised 17 December 1770 – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. Beethoven remains one of the most admired composers in the history of Western music; his works rank amongst the most performed of the classical music repertoire. His works span the transition from the classical period to the romantic era in classical music. His career has conventionally been divided into early, middle, and late periods. The "early" period, during which he forged his craft, is typically considered to have lasted until 1802. From 1802 to around 1812, his "middle" period showed an individual development from the "classical" styles of Joseph Haydn and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and is sometimes characterized as "heroic". During this time he began to suffer increasingly from deafness. In his "late" period from 1812 to his death in 1827, he extended his innovations in musical form and expression.

    Born in Bonn, Beethoven's musical talent was obvious at an early age, and he was initially harshly and intensively taught by his father Johann van Beethoven. Beethoven was later taught by the composer and conductor Christian Gottlob Neefe, under whose tutelage he published his first work, a set of keyboard variations, in 1783. He found relief from a dysfunctional home life with the family of Helene von Breuning, whose children he loved, befriended, and taught piano. At age 21, he moved to Vienna, which subsequently became his base, and studied composition with Haydn. Beethoven then gained a reputation as a virtuoso pianist, and he was soon courted by Karl Alois, Prince Lichnowsky for compositions, which resulted in his three Opus 1 piano trios (the earliest works to which he accorded an opus number) in 1795.

    His first major orchestral work, the First Symphony, appeared in 1800, and his first set of string quartets was published in 1801. During this period, his hearing began to deteriorate, but he continued to conduct, premiering his Third and Fifth Symphonies in 1804 and 1808, respectively. His Violin Concerto appeared in 1806. His last piano concerto (No. 5, Op. 73, known as the 'Emperor'), dedicated to his frequent patron Archduke Rudolf of Austria, was premiered in 1810, but not with Beethoven as soloist. He was almost completely deaf by 1814, and he then gave up performing and appearing in public. He described his problems with health and his unfulfilled personal life in two letters, his "Heiligenstadt Testament" (1802) to his brothers and his unsent love letter to an unknown "Immortal Beloved" (1812).

    In the years from 1810, increasingly less socially involved, Beethoven composed many of his most admired works including his later symphonies and his mature chamber music and piano sonatas. His only opera, Fidelio, which had been first performed in 1805, was revised to its final version in 1814. He composed his Missa Solemnis in the years 1819–1823, and his final, Ninth, Symphony, one of the first examples of a choral symphony, in 1822–1824. Written in his last years, his late string quartets of 1825–26 are amongst his final achievements. After some months of bedridden illness, he died in 1827. Beethoven's works remain mainstays of the classical music repertoire.