site loader

Fruit Bats Tour 2021 - 2022

The Fruit Bats tickets are already available!

The biggest music event won’t pass you by and you will be able to savor it at the fullest! This tour is going to be huge and you can be a part of it. Is there a fan that wouldn’t appreciate front row tickets for an affordable price?

This year has been incredible for Fruit Bats and their latest tour is the proof of that. There is plenty of evidence for that. Every concert sees a huge number of fans gather around the stage in anticipation of a wonderful experience. Huge stages all around the world are set to host these incredible live shows. Our service is also offering Fruit Bats VIP packages for dedicated fans.

We make sure to offer the most competitive prices for tickets for different concerts. Getting tickets for the first row is also not a problem. You can actually choose your ticket based on seat preference. Just check the concert schedule and decide what the best spot to see and hear everything is!

Every Fruit Bats concert gives a unique experience that cannot be replicated anywhere else. Even the best headphones or the largest TV screen doesn’t compare to the feeling of excitement and emotion at a concert while being surrounded by thousands of people who share the same passion. This is why fans of quality music prefer going to big concerts and booking the best spots in order not to lose any detail of the show. With us it is easy to check the schedule of the concerts and find out about other important details.

You can check the ticket availability for your hometown concert right now! All the information regarding the Fruit Bats tour 2021/2022 can be found right here, on our website.


Fruit Bats Tickets 2021 - 2022



Fruit Bats VIP Packages 2021 - 2022



    You need other meet and greet tickets?



    About Fruit Bats

    Megabats constitute the family Pteropodidae of the order Chiroptera (bats). They are also called fruit bats, Old World fruit bats, or—especially the genera Acerodon and Pteropus—flying foxes. They are the only member of the superfamily Pteropodoidea, which is one of two superfamilies in the suborder Yinpterochiroptera. Internal divisions of Pteropodidae have varied since subfamilies were first proposed in 1917. From three subfamilies in the 1917 classification, six are now recognized, along with various tribes. As of 2018, 197 species of megabat had been described.

    The understanding of the evolution of megabats has been determined primarily by genetic data, as the fossil record for this family is the most fragmented of all bats. They likely evolved in Australasia, with the common ancestor of all living pteropodids existing approximately 31 million years ago. Many of their lineages probably originated in Melanesia, then dispersed over time to mainland Asia, the Mediterranean, and Africa. Today, they are found in tropical and subtropical areas of Eurasia, Africa, and Oceania.

    The megabat family contains the largest bat species, with individuals of some species weighing up to 1.45 kg (3.2 lb) and having wingspans up to 1.7 m (5.6 ft). Not all megabats are large-bodied; nearly a third of all species weigh less than 50 g (1.8 oz). They can be differentiated from other bats due to their dog-like faces, clawed second digits, and reduced uropatagium. Only members of one genus, Notopteris, have tails. Megabats have several adaptations for flight, including rapid oxygen consumption, the ability to sustain heart rates of more than 700 beats per minute, and large lung volumes.

    Most megabats are nocturnal or crepuscular, although a few species are active during the daytime. During the period of inactivity, they roost in trees or caves. Members of some species roost alone, while others form colonies of up to a million individuals. During the period of activity, they use flight to travel to food resources. With few exceptions, they are unable to echolocate, relying instead on keen senses of sight and smell to navigate and locate food. Most species are primarily frugivorous and several are nectarivorous. Other less common food resources include leaves, pollen, twigs, and bark.

    They reach sexual maturity slowly and have a low reproductive output. Most species have one offspring at a time after a pregnancy of four to six months. This low reproductive output means that after a population loss their numbers are slow to rebound. A quarter of all species are listed as threatened, mainly due to habitat destruction and overhunting. Megabats are a popular food source in some areas, leading to population declines and extinction. They are also of interest to those involved in public health as they are natural reservoirs of several viruses that can affect humans.